Panton Fellowship: End of Year Report

PLEASE NOTE: This article is just the advert for my Panton report, NOT the report itself! You can download a PDF of my 12-page end of year report here, all in glorious technicolour…

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Twelve months on from the start of mine and Ross Mounce‘s Panton Fellowships with the Open Knowledge Foundation, it’s time to take stock of where we’ve got to in that time.Β And how quickly the time has gone!

The Contents of a Year

Yes, the time might have flown by, but it’s time for the concluding Panton report. At the request of the OKFN, I’ve produced a full report on my work in Open Science and Open Education over the past year – you can download a copy here. I’ve tried to provide a fairly all-round picture of the major meetings, trips and of course an overview of the Open Science Training Initiative. Alas though, there wasn’t space to fit every last bit of news in, so feel free to leave me a comment/message on this blog or on my Twitter account if you’d like to know more about my Panton experiences!

Just to clear up any confusion though: I know some of you are also awaiting my post-pilot report on the inaugural OSTI scheme. It should be released in the next fortnight , and is a completely separate report to the one I’ve listed above. So don’t worry – those details, and indeed all the OSTI course materials, will be appearing very soon. I’ll be publicising it on Twitter and here on my blog once that happens, although I can add you to the direct mailing list for OSTI releases if you send an email to enquiries(at)opensciencetraining.com πŸ™‚

Much of my focus has been on furthering the integration of open practices within academia, through development and delivery of graduate-level open science education. Meanwhile, my Bath-based counterpart, Ross Mounce, has done a phenomenal amount of work for policy development in open access and open data, including trips to Brussels and appearances on the radio, alongside data mining work inspired by his background in phylogenetics. That’s only the tip of the iceberg though, so I’ll leave it to Ross to tell the story in his own words – I’ll be posting a link to his blog in the next 24 hours, as soon as his review appears online. [EDIT: Ross’ review now up on the OKFN blog – read it here] So definitely take a look! And we’ve both enjoyed some great opportunities to promote the world of Open at conferences, workshops and meet-ups to a diverse range of audiences. We’ve met some fantastic people along the way.

And last but not least…

I also want to reiterate the final message from my end-of-year report: many thanks to the Panton Advisory Board, and indeed to all the folks at the OKFN who have provided sterling support throughout the last year. While I’m keen to avoid the excessive “Gwynnie” approach, there are nonetheless some particular names I’d like to mention. Thanks to Laura Newman, for seeing me through the hectic early days of the fellowship term and to Joris Pekel for stepping in to look after the Fellows since September; to Peter Murray-Rust, for inspirational, ebullient mentorship; to Greg Wilson, for being an absolute guru for educational practice and a bringer of calm; to Puneet Kishor, for his advice and faith in OSTI’s potential; and to Jenny Molloy, for advice, opinions and Oxford-based support!

I’m aiming to put together another blog post in early May, reflecting on what it’s been like to combine the Panton role with my DPhil/PhD commitments. If you’re a prospective Panton applicant for future Fellowship calls, hopefully it’ll prove useful.I should stress though that the end of the Fellowship certainly isn’t spelling the end of my work with OSTI – in fact, it’s more of a beginning. The fellowship year has provided the opportunity to create this wonderful initiative – now we move on to the process of growing it over time. But for today, it’s back to research with me (more specifically, to making my little in silico cells behave in C++). Bye for now!

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Bringing Open Science Training to San Francisco

It’s been great visiting the States this week – and California, of all places. For starters, it made for a significant jump in the mercury on leaving the UK on Monday. What to Californians is a bit of an off week weatherwise is way, way better than what I could expect from the British summer!

Funny what travelling abroad does to you though. My friends know I’m a coffee drinker. I’ll take coffee over tea almost any day. Yet, set me down in a coffee house in SF and I find myself saying, “could I have an English Breakfast tea, please?” in what must sound like the most stereotypically English accent. Whether or not this is some subconscious response on my part to those wonderfully relaxed Californian requests for “caw-fee“, I’m not entirely certain. Seen objectively though, it feels a bit fraudulent on my part. Perhaps it’s indicative of some ingrained loyalty to the motherland.

From coffee to (scientific) culture…

National cultural differences and beverage selection aside, it’s time I mentioned what I’m actually doing in California. I’m talking now about scientific culture. Or, more to the point, how we can go about changing the prevailing culture for the better. Following on from the OSTI pilot, we’re now trying to establish the scheme at other institutions in the UK and beyond. Hence my visit to San Francisco this week – I’ve been visiting Puneet Kishor at Creative Commons, and together we’ve been on a promotional drive involving several institutions in the area. And as you know, SF isn’t short of world-class universities. One look at the parking lot in Berkeley campus tells you that much:

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Proof of concept for the OSTI approach to training may be complete, but adapting the initiative to diverse course structures in particular institutions is the next challenge. Discussions this week have really helped shape plans for how we can achieve this…Monday to Friday has seen a fair few open science conversations. Jet lag well and truly kicking in, I made it to dinner on the night of my arrival, meeting with Greg Wilson and several others involved with either Software Carpentry, Wikimedia Foundation or open data projects. A great start to my US visit – I can only hope that I wasn’t too incoherent from the 19 hours of travel that preceded it! :S

Tuesday was spent at Creative Commons HQ in Mountain View (plus a trip to a Big Data event at LinkedIn in the evening). The guys and gals at CC are a fantastic group of people and I enjoyed some great discussions with various members of the team over the course of the day. I had the opportunity to present their “Lunch & Learn” seminar to promote my OSTI and gain some feedback from them on how it might be applied elsewhere. If you’d like to read more about that, you might want to take a look at the Creative Commons blog post covering the event. And their generosity even extended to gifting me a Creative Commons T-shirt, which should be making some appearances at Open events in the future πŸ™‚

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Since Wednesday, I have become vastly more acquainted with the SF public transport system, as Puneet and I made our way around various institutions, talking to a number of academics who may be able to suggest potential openings for my open science training regime. These have included: Jonathan Eisen of UC-Davis; Roberta Katz, VP for Strategic Planning at Stanford; Sameer Verma of SF State U; Rich Schneider of UCSF; and Michael Eisen at Berkeley. Hopefully this will pave the way for a variety of OSTI applications in the US and indeed other countries too! There’s now massive incentive for me to get to work on curating the slide decks and other course materials into a ready-for-release version.

This week has felt really productive and incredibly exciting. I think we’re on the verge of a whole new era of science education (and in a way, professional development training for academics). The coming months and years will hopefully see this realised across the disciplines, delivering to its full potential the multitude of benefits it can provide. It only remains for me to thank the OKFN and Panton Fellowship funders, without whose financial support this trip would not have come about; and of course a huge debt of gratitude to Puneet for hosting me this week and arranging such a fantastic schedule. Thanks all πŸ™‚

Making the Case for Open Science Training: Panton in Jan/Feb 2013

Without a doubt, I’ve never blogged from a nicer location. This month’s update comes to you from the Creative Commons offices at Mt. View, just outside San Francisco. The California sunshine has put me in a good mood to write about the happenings of the past 2 months of my Panton Fellowship…and a LOT has happened since my last update. Setting aside my wonderment at how the year went by so quickly, it’s time I updated you on the Open Science Training Initiative (OSTI) pilot, the follow-up meetings in the immediate aftermath, and developments at Oxford with potential for further instances of the OSTI.

Culmination of the Panton work: Running the OSTI Pilot

I realise now that I was being seriously optimistic in hoping to blog progress with the OSTI pilot day-by-day. Perhaps inevitably, the demands of running a course for 43 graduates, involving in-person supervisory meetings with all the groups and delivery of the accompanying lecture series, left little time for me to get near a computer. Apologies to those who had anticipated watching the course unfold through my blogging!

The pilot scheme ran from January 10th through to January 18th, at the Doctoral Training Centre at the University of Oxford. Themed on computational biology, the course developed knowledge of programming and mathematical modelling, while mandating students to license their research outputs and deliver a coherent research story. This required them to draw on all elements of the research process (code, data, writing) as an integrated whole, rather than focusing on the written report alone. Lecturing in Open is all very well and good, but it’s first-hand experience of the techniques, approaches and culture that is most effective in breaking down misapprehensions and which provides researchers with the confidence to implement Open approaches in the future.

The first lecture of the course provided one of the biggest wake-up calls to the Open community I’ve yet encountered. Informally, I asked the students to raise their hands if they’d heard of open science, or knew something about it. Of those 43 students, only ONE raised their hand. Now this might be a fairly approximate metric, but it says a great deal about how much work we need to do in educating people about the ways of Open – let’s not forget, these are pretty switched on, well informed students in general. There’s plenty of fantastic work going on in the development of policy and infrastructure to support the transition to an open working culture, but we have a lot of work to do if the transition to openness is to happen effectively and smoothly. Now is the time to ask how we can engage with those who aren’t part of the Open community.

So here’s a challenge for you. If each of us could find even one way to engage with academics at our respective institutions – BEYOND the open community – at some time over the next 2 months, to educate in Open, raise awareness, and dispel the myths and misinformation, then that will represent some small progress in what we’re all trying to achieve.

Students filled in a questionnaire on completion of the course, and I’ve also been able to draw on the opinions and experiences of our course demonstrators and centre directors. Based on this, and on my own impressions of how things went (it was hard work, but I was there full-time for the whole thing, supervising each research team on a daily basis), I’m compiling a post-pilot report on the outcomes. Watch out for that over the coming weeks – as soon as it’s ready, it’ll be made available for download online.

OSTI Online

Yep, I mentioned the post-pilot report being released online just now, didn’t I? More to the point, it’s going to be released via the OSTI website, which is now live at www.opensciencetraining.com and whose content will grow over the coming months as I have the opportunity to extend the copy. There’s a lot more to be done of course, but for now there’s a brief intro to the motivation behind OSTI and an outline of its structure. There are also listings for the Lightning Lecture component of the programme, to provide you with some idea of the topics addressed. I’m in the process of curating and refining the slide decks for the course, based on exit feedback from the pilot participants; these will be released online over the next month once final versions are available. So watch this space!

Open Training at Oxford

I’ve also spent some of the past month engaging with the administrative arm of the University of Oxford, regarding provision for open science training. Basically, MPLS Division (maths, physical & life sciences) have indicated an interest in taking my OSTI and putting it out for use in other departments. Really excited about this! If we can get the training initiative installed in other settings in a variety of forms, it should provide us with a template for adaptable open training across an institution. The OSTI pilot demonstrated proof of concept: now it’s time to diversify its applications and see which forms work for people, and in what form the course can be most beneficial.

And given my current location in SF, California, it’s apparent I’ve spent recent weeks preparing for a trip Stateside, to carry out a promo drive for the OSTI. But more on that another time…there’s going to be lots more to tell in my next posting. See you then!

Open Science Training Initiative – Pilot Scheme Complete!

You could be forgiven for thinking I’d gone very quiet this week. As many of you may remember, the pilot scheme for my Open Science Training Initiative kicked off on January 10th. It’s been a pretty hectic time since then, but we’ve finally reached the closing day – the students are pushing final versions of all their work onto GitHub in the next hour, before presenting their findings from 10:30am onwards.

I’d had this insanely optimistic idea at the outset of blogging progress with the course every other day, or at least at the end of each of the rotation phases. Yep, that turned out to be WAY too optimistic. Once all the lecturing and project supervision meetings were factored in, I barely made it anywhere near my computer each day. Those of you who emailed me may have noticed the, ahem, somewhat tardy replies. All for good reason though – the students have done a fantastic job, produced some really creative work, and I’m looking forward to seeing all the results today – even if it’ll leave me stuck under a stack of marking for a fortnight!

I released a short feedback questionnaire to the students just now, so by the end of today we should have some idea of what they’ve enjoyed in the course, and importantly, how they think we could improve it in the future. I don’t think I’ve ever been subjected to this much judgment in one go before, so let’s hope it all goes ok… Ultimately I’ll be releasing all the findings and analysis in an evaluation report (most probably sometime in February), which will also take account of comments from the course demonstrators, some of whom were with the projects right from the beginning of the course. So keep an eye out for that.

I have to say I was seriously impressed by how they’ve taken to licensing as well. From the general show of hands I asked for in lectures, this area was completely new to all of them. This really shows how much work we need to do in educating our academics in Open practice if we’re going to aid the uptake of these approaches – at the moment, the awareness isn’t there in vast sections of the community. By the end of Phase 1 on the Monday, they’d got the hang of data, code and content licensing to the point where I was fielding some fairly subtle questions in specific cases. Some of you may have noticed me tendering one of these out to the OKFN discussion lists… GitHub for Windows proved really problematic though – more on that in the report and any other blog posts I get around to writing. We’d definitely need to do things differently in that department next time.

Anyway, proper update on the details of both rotation phases will follow, once I get through today and actually get some sleep. For now though, it’s probably time to get ready for the onslaught of the talks. It’s already snowing pretty heavily outside – something tells me I may end up walking home tonight, once the day is done! :S

Promotion, Preparation and Productivity: Open Science Sabbatical, December 2012

This month’s posting comes to you from a train somewhere between Manchester and Oxford – I’m making my most of the work time as I journey home from the seventh wedding I’ve been to in the past eight months. At time of writing, the start of the OSTI pilot is only 5 days away, so as you can imagine it’s been a bit of a nonstop month! The run-up to Christmas brought a combination of a website launch, promotional work, design and brand development for the OSTI, masses of lecture planning and preparation of course materials.

Perhaps the most significant development of December was the supervisors giving the thumbs-up to a “mini-sabbatical” of sorts, allowing me to focus solely on my open science fellowship. It’s really helped shape the course materials into an almost-finished state. I’ll save the finer details for the OSTI blogging phase later in the week, but the rough schedule of lightning lectures looks something like this:

  • Thursday 10th – (2 lectures) Reproducibility and Open Science; Open Source Coding & Version Control Using GitHub
  • Friday 11th – Licensing Your Data
  • Monday 14th – Data Management Plans & Scientific Workflows (incl. guest speaker Jun Zhao)
  • Tuesday 15th – The Changing Face of Publication
  • Thursday 17th – OKFN Session
  • Friday 18th – Presentation Day (assessment requirement for all participants)

Bear in mind that by the start of the course, the students will have already received 2 weeks’ training in Matlab and its applications, including GUI development and parallel implementation. The OSTI phase will span the assessment period for the course, themed around mathematical modelling of cancer and infectious disease.

The NERC Town Meeting (as I mentioned in my post from August 2012) provided considerable motivation for development of a website and other promotional materials for the OSTI, and took place in London on December 11th. Trialling the OSTI in an EPSRC DTC provides an excellent basis for transferring the course to similar DTP teaching models in other disciplines, and so I joined the preliminary meeting to promote the OSTI to prospective contract bidders. Drawing academics from across the UK, the meeting proved to be a reasonably productive day for open science discussion and I enjoyed some really good conversations with representatives and educationalists from, amongst others, Warwick, Oxford, Royal Holloway and the Natural History Museum.

So, what of the new aesthetic for the OSTI brand? In the interests of developing a cohesive identity for the initiative, the design needed to be consistent across all physical handouts and the website. I opted for a green, black and gold colour scheme in the end, and you can see the results in the images below (front and reverse sides of the leaflet are shown). And in keeping with the spirit of OSTI, the striking images in the design are all Creative Commons licensed content – it’s a pleasure to see such high-quality images available for use under CC license and certainly made the design process much easier for me. A CMYK version for printing will be made available via the OSTI website once the content is expanded.

OSTI Promotional Leaflet (Reverse)So, what of that website? I should warn you now that the site is live in its basic form, but hasn’t had its official public launch yet (announcement on that will follow when the time comes). You can find it at http://www.opensciencetraining.com – at present there’s just a mission statement on the opening page and a couple of other tabs with contact details. I’ll be adding content over the next month, starting with a description of the course structure and lectures, and extending to downloadable slides and materials once the course is underway. Feel free to drop me a message if you’d like to be emailed once full content and materials downloads start to appear…

Another exciting development in December was a meeting with Will Hutton, author of the bestselling work “The State We’re In” and current Principal of Hertford College, Oxford. Organised by Jenny Molloy, the gathering included a variety of faces from the Open community in Oxford, including Chas Bountra of the Structural Genomics Consortium, Simon Benjamin of Quantalk and Sally Rumsey of the Bodleian Library. Will discussed his plans to establish a series of studentships in Open Science at Hertford College, potentially in association with the Big Innovation Centre, and provided us all with a fantastic opportunity to debate the state of open science too. If this project gains the necessary funding and support to come to fruition then it could lead to a considerable hub of open research activity being established in Oxford, with the power to unify the diverse threads of open activity already taking place within the University’s departments, and to inspire novel working practices in young academics. I should stress that it’s early days yet, so keep an eye out for further news as the project develops.

So, what for January 2013? This year involves something of a running start, given the imminent beginning of the OSTI pilot on the 10th. I’m aiming to blog my progress with the course as it happens, or at least every other day if things end up being pretty hectic. Once we hit the 18th (and, moreover, once marking of the assessed work is out of the way) it’ll be onto the evaluation phase and the post-pilot report. I’ll also be following up with a few people from the NERC Town Meeting and meeting with MPLS (the physical and life sciences division) in Oxford to discuss how the OSTI might be applied to other departments outside the DTC. And there may even be a trip to the States in the pipeline…but more on that in a few weeks’ time…

Research Workflows, Sustainability and Software Education: Panton in October

Well, October has been a rollercoaster month: owing to an unfortunate spell of ill health, it’s been a much quieter time than I originally intended. Nonetheless, there have been plenty of new contacts, interactions, meetings and developments…

October brought interesting discussions with Jun Zhao about sustainability in research, drawing on her expertise in scientific workflows. Jun is currently a postdoctoral researcher in the Zoology department at the University of Oxford, focusing on a broad spectrum of projects that address linked data, the semantic web and aim to facilitate fuller integration of data into our published research. In particular we spoke about one of her main projects, Wf4Ever, which aims to foster “repeatable, reproducible and repurposable research” by uniting scientific workflows and digital libraries as well as facilitating systematic data processing. We spoke at length about my plans for open science graduate training in Oxford and I’m looking into the possibility of incorporating a live demo of her research tools into the OSTI in January, as part of the “lightning lectures”.

My ongoing contact with Kirsty Grainger and Amy Vitale at NERC (the Natural Environment Research Council) has continued during October, ahead of the Town Meeting taking place on 11th December. NERC has this week officially opened the competition to award Doctoral Training Partnerships across the UK. Jenny Molloy and I are now officially signed up for the meeting in order to promote my OSTI and to generally encourage the applicant groups to incorporate open science into their courses. It’s a great opportunity to increase the uptake of open science practices nationally and we’re really looking forward to it! This also represents great timing in relation to my OSTI, which is entering the late stages of planning at the moment. The OSTI’s aims in fostering reproducibility and equipping students for interdisciplinary research across the sciences has great potential to contribute to the “research and training excellence” demanded of the new DTPs. The landscape of research is changing rapidly: we need to teach our upcoming young researchers to deal with this evolution NOW, and graduate training represents a fantastic way to achieve this. If science as a whole is to transition to an open model, we need this change to come from the bottom up as well as from the top down. With an OSTI website, flyers and other promotional material in production at present, there should be rather a lot to talk about in next month’s blog post πŸ™‚

Unfortunately though I was ill for Open Access Week, which was a real shame. Quite a few events were arranged in Oxford, including a seminar series throughout the week from the Bodleian Library and culminating in a Wikipedia edit-a-thon, which extended the Women in Science work started earlier in 2012 by the Ada Lovelace Day event at the British Library. Seminars ranged from Open Law to examining the ethics of OA in health research, to looking at how OA initiatives are shaping the research environment for Generation Y, our youngest generation of researchers. And if you missed the talks you can find the slides on the Bodleian’s OA Week page here. And while I’m on the subject, those of you who haven’t yet seen the fantastic PhD Comics video on Open Access should take a look now:

 

I was fortunate to join the much-anticipated Software Carpentry workshop at the end of the month, held over two days at the University of Oxford’s Department of Biochemistry. These workshops introduce scientists to basic computing and programming skills, enabling them to program with confidence and handle coding more effectively and efficiently in their research. I was really impressed at how the material engaged with the broad spectrum of experience amongst the attendees: some people I spoke to had minimal experience in programming, while others joined for the more challenging tasks and applications. The session was friendly and accessible and the people I spoke to also praised the online tutorials available on the course website. Massive thanks to the main organiser of the Oxford workshop, Philip Fowler, for letting me sit in on the session! If you think there’s an opening for an SWC boot camp at your institution, I’d really recommend getting in touch with the team to see what can be arranged – it’s a great initiative that has a great deal to offer the scientific community. And even better, all their content is available under a Creative Commons Attribution licence.

MozFest, Mozilla’s annual festival showcasing a variety of tech and web developments, hands-on peer learning sessions and educational initiatives, is a matter of hours away at time of writing. I’ll be arriving in London on the Friday and am really looking forward to it…if you’re going to be there and fancy some open science chat, then feel free to drop me a message! And keep an eye out for my OKFN colleagues running the Saturday workshop, “Data Expeditions: Scouting the Data Landscape with our Data Sherpas” which focuses on data wrangling skills and techniques and promises to be both fun and informative.

So, what for the next month? Planning and preparation for the OSTI will really start to gather pace over November: in my next Panton update, I’ll be reporting on the OSTI website and promo materials; hopefully releasing the provisional timetable; sharing my experiences of MozFest; and keeping you up to date on progress with the plans Jenny and I are forming for an Oxford-based hackday. And to finish on a lighthearted (and tasty) note: in lieu of full participation in OA Week, I am tempted to make some Open Access Cupcakes in the very near future…methinks an Open Knowledge Okapi can be realised in ready-to-roll icing. Bring on the Open Kitchen – photos to appear soon!

A World of Digital Openness: Panton in September

With October now well underway, I’m actually halfway through my Panton Fellowship year: how on earth did the time pass by so quickly? Time does indeed fly by when you’re having lots of (open science) fun. Much of September centred around data release and licensing and digital management, thanks to two big conference events. It was always clear that September was going to be a busy month! Juggling two conferences a week apart with DPhil research/chapter writing/papering up felt like an adrenaline sport at the time (offering the same combination of excitement, fear and tiredness) but was a really valuable and enjoyable experience. So, here’s what went on in September…

First up was the Digital Research 2012 conference, hosted by the Oxford e-Research Centre and held in the striking surroundings of St. Catherine’s College at the University of Oxford. Peter Murray-Rust, Jenny Molloy and I organised and led the OKFN session on the Tuesday morning, starting with Peter’s plenary lecture (read his blog on the subject here, followed by Jenny showcasing several different OKFN projects, including CKAN, DataHub and PubCrawler, through an on-screen software demo. I rounded out the session by chairing a 45 minute panel debate entitled, “Surfing the Wave of Open Data: Why, When and How?“, which aimed to generate discussion on how we release and publish our data and to consider how our approaches to this need to evolve in the years to come. We were joined by a fantastic line-up of panel speakers: Mark Hahnel of Figshare, Juan Bicarregui of STFC, Mark Elliot of CCSR and Brian Hole of Ubiquity Press. As far as I’m aware, the entire conference programme was filmed: the footage is being processed at the moment and should be up on the ‘Digital Research 2012‘ YouTube channel as soon as it’s ready. Will update you as soon as I hear anything! Hopefully the OKFN session will be online for viewing very soon, so you can all catch up on the presentations, demos and debate you may have missed.

The intervening period between the two conferences was mostly given over to completing the Panton Principles video I mentioned in my previous two posts. I started scripting and filming this at the end of August: it’s only the second video I’ve ever made, so I’m still getting used to the medium really, but it’s great fun. The first ‘film short’ I made was actually my application video for the Panton Fellowship (back in February of this year). Location spotters amongst you may be interested to know that we filmed this one in the library of Keble College, Oxford – it seemed appropriate that I should be surrounded by lots of scientific information while promoting principles which support the release of scientific data! Thankfully I overcame most of my filming nerves earlier this year, so it was easier to stand in front of the camera second time around. It wasn’t without its problems though: natural lighting conditions on the first morning of filming were far too bright and I ended up looking practically corpse-like on screen; not a healthy look for a promotional video! Thankfully the second morning of filming (assisted by the return of my now-familIar red dress) proved more successful. Huge thanks to Alastair Kay for endless patience behind the camera and for all his work editing the material into finished form, and to Ross Mounce for looking over the script and suggesting some additions…hopefully they’re as pleased with the end result as I.

The video is available on YouTube, released under a CC-BY-3.0 licence, so please feel free to use it to spread the open science gospel further afield πŸ™‚ I’m also arranging for a downloadable version to be released in the very near future, so watch this space. Information in text form might be useful in some cases, but lots of legal-looking writing or formal guidelines can look rather intimidating and deter people sometimes. Alternative media such as film provide a great way of imparting the same information in an accessible, friendly and non-intimidating way. Let’s embrace this more in the future!

The subject of OKFest needs no introduction really…with the #okfest hashtag not just trending but skyrocketing on Twitter from the first day of the conference, it was always set to be a dynamic, exciting and much talked about event. I won’t repeat the multitude of bloggers who’ve already described so many aspects of the week: suffice to say it was utterly fantastic and I was sad that I could only join for two days (and you can read my previous blog post with all the relevant video links here). I arrived in Helsinki on the Tuesday and was on a plane flying back to Heathrow by the Thursday night, but it realy was a fantastic two days. Wednesday was the busiest day for me, with plenty of involvement in the Open Education stream, chairing the panel discussion on ‘Immediate Access to Raw Data from Experiments‘ before Ross Mounce and I showcased our Fellowship work. And so it was time for the much-awaited unveiling of my new Panton Principles video I mentioned earlier…and then into my presentation as part of the Panton Fellows’ session (available on Bambuser here, and you should also check out the other videos from the stream, including the panel discussions and Ross Mounce’s Panton presentation, as well). Much of my talk addressed the issues of reproducibility in scientific research, before introducing the audience to my OSTI ahead of its launch in December 2012. Following on from OKFest, I have a few articles in the pipeline on the reproducibility issue, so keep your eyes peeled for those.

Equally invaluable at OKFest were the many opportunities to make new contacts: amongst others, I was fortunate to be introduced to Puneet Kishor of Creative Commons and Philipp Schmidt of the Peer-to-Peer University. It was great to meet them and discuss my plans: my discussions with Puneet will hopefully help in expanding the OSTI approach into the US once I’ve run the pilot, which is a hugely exciting prospect. In fact, all my conversations with fellow scientists, data wranglers, educationalists and open science aficionados over the past month has made me really excited about the prospects for my OSTI when we launch later this term. My conversations with Puneet were in fact one of the things that cemented my resolve to establish a proper website for the scheme, which will be one of the major focuses in the coming months. It’ll provide you all with updates, progress, information and more as the project evolves and is being planned right now. Needless to say, I’ll keep you posted…

Well time is short this month, soΒ  I’ll have to disappear for now – but it looks as though plenty of things are happening in October. I’ll be liaising further with several people at NERC to confirm the details of the town meetings for their prospective Doctoral Training Partnerships in Nov/Dec: getting our OSTI up and running across the UK would be really exciting! I’m also getting to work on planning course content and a further video on “Demystifying Data Licensing” as well as doing early-stage planning and development on the OSTI website. Lots to keep me busy – I’ll let you know how it all goes!